Why Garrosh is following in his father’s footsteps

Pride will come before the fall

Grom Hellscream was prideful and blood thirsty. He was a mighty warrior who sealed his fate by drinking the blood of Mannoroth, binding his people to the demon’s blood for years. He drank to defeat foes that he and his race were tricked into slaughtering at the will of the very demons they thought they were subjugating. They nearly eradicated the Draenei, and then once their task was done, they became restless from the demon blood burning in them, and began attacking each other, before moving onto Azeroth. All because the mighty Grom Hellscream, wielder of Gorehowl, drank the blood of demons.

Flash forward to the present day. The heir of Grom, Garrosh, is now a leader among the Horde. Once a weak, sick boy, unable to even lift a weapon to combat his father’s enemies, Garrosh has grown into a strong warrior. Alas, Garrosh has the same flaw which brought about his father’s down fall, and the fall of the entire Horde in the second war, Pride. Garrosh feels his people are capable of destroying all of the alliance, and defeat every threat to this world without any help from others. Would Garrosh drink the blood of a demon if promised it would give him the upper hand on the Alliance, giving the entirety of Azeroth to the Horde? You bet he would, and he too, would fall.

Grom was too eager, too blinded by his bloodlust without even the taste of the demon’s blood, to see the trap, the tricks being played on him by Kil’Jaeden. Garrosh too is blinded by blood lust, by an insane need to slaughter those he sees as responsible for the fall of the first horde, that he would too take any advantage offered to him that would give him and his warriors the ability to crush the pesky alliance forces.

No doubt, Variann Wrynn shares similar traits to his own father as well, believing the alliance is undeafeatable, where his father felt Stormwind could not fall, and both seem to be destined to follow the same path, though one can only hope that Variann will be willing to listen to the wisdom of others like Jaina and his son. This article, though, is not about Variann, it’s about Garrosh, even though both do share several personality aspects.

I personally feel that Garrosh becoming warchief, which has been rumored but not confirmed recently confirmed, would be the worst possible thing for the Horde. The Horde is already a blood thirsty, battle hungry organization, even when their leader wishes peace, but a leader who only wishes to see more blood on the blade than peace talks and cooperation will be their downfall. Indeed, Garrosh Hellscream will bring about the downfall of the Horde, much like his father’s actions led to the fall of the first Horde.

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2 Responses to Why Garrosh is following in his father’s footsteps

  1. Jenazpod says:

    The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree in most families, so, why should the Hellscreams be any different? It’s also pretty standard system with ruling families that the son is going to grow up to take the father’s place in power. If you grow up knowing that your father is Warchief, I can see where it might make you assume that someday, you will be Warchief too. If you idolize your father, as many young boys do, you might grow up wanting to become just like dear old dad. Put all that together, and yeah, The Horde is going to get itself another Grom as leader really soon.
    Personally, due to recent circumstances in my own life, I could really go for some “blood thirsty, battle hungry” gameplay right about now.

  2. Medros says:

    Grom was actually never Warchief, hell at the time he drank the blood he wasn’t even the leader of a clan, only the second in command of the Warsong clan. Sadly it seems that Thrall telling Garrosh of how great his father was, how he sacrificed himself for the Orcs, got the wrong message through to him, instead of the ‘your father was an idiot who had to make amends with his life’ Garrosh seemed to get ‘your father was a great man, who sacrificed his life for the Horde’. Sad, really.

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